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Reflections on Our One-Year Anniversary

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AIDS.gov Team - 2009

The AIDS.gov Team

On our one-year blogging anniversary, the AIDS.gov team wants to share with you some important things we’ve learned about new media and how we can use it in response to HIV and AIDS.

First, as we noted in last week’s post, we’ve found that people living with HIV and AIDS are already using the Internet to access HIV and support information. That means those we serve are ahead of many of us in using new media.

Second, many of our colleagues freely acknowledge that they need and want to learn more about how to use new media tools to promote HIV prevention, testing, treatment, and research. In 2009, AIDS.gov will commit a significant portion of our resources to ensure that those responsible for HIV programs have opportunities to learn what they need to know about new media.

After a year of blogging, we recognize the bottom line—the HIV epidemic in the U.S. is worse than we thought, and we need to deploy every possible tool we have to meet that challenge.

After a year of blogging, we recognize the bottom line—the HIV epidemic in the U.S. is worse than we thought, and we need to deploy every possible tool we have to meet that challenge. New media technologies offer us powerful, cost-effective tools, and we should assess whether they can help us prevent the further spread of HIV, while helping people living with HIV and AIDS to secure and maintain care.

This will take planning, of course. We need to consider how we are using new media tools and determine which tools are most effective in our particular circumstances. We also need to accept that it’s okay if we don’t know or understand fully what new media tools can do.

In 2009, we’re going to have to acknowledge reality—we no longer have the option of ignoring new media. Many of those we serve will demand that we use new media tools to support them, and they deserve our best efforts.

AIDS.gov is proud of the new media resources we offer. We hope you will explore and use our new media tool kit, and we also encourage you to take advantage of the CDC’s eHealth data briefs.

We have shared our lessons learned from the past year—now we hope YOU will comment with the lessons you have learned and your ideas for 2009. Because new media is participatory, it needs to be a conversation to be successful.

As we begin this new year, we strongly encourage you to take the time to learn about new media—no matter what it takes or where you start. It’s that important. And if we can help you, it will be an honor.

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Comments

  1. You all are doing an excellent job of getting the word out on the uses of new media to combat the AIDS problem (and yes, it is a very big problem). Keep up the great work.

  2. Marcus says:

    It seems that the HIV epidemic has not been in the news lately. I’m pleased to see that you guys are exploring new ways to get the word out about AIDS prevention. Keep up the good work.

  3. Chelsea says:

    I so appreciate your efforts. I worry as there seems to be less in the media, less attention to this terrible epidemic, and I know first hand the destruction it causes. Technology is a huge distration but also a means to educate. I hope people will continue to pass our message along so we can work for a better tomorrow.

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