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I Know. I Took the Test: National HIV Testing Day Call to Action

Back in April, I shared that according to CDC estimates, one of every five people living with HIV in the U.S. is unaware of their HIV status. Stigma remains a barrier to people getting an HIV test. I also asked for your suggestions in naming our AIDS.gov National HIV Testing Day (NHTD) initiative which will feature stories from people just like you who have taken an HIV test.

THANK YOU for your suggestions and votes. The winner is: “I Know. I Took the Test”!

As NHTD approaches (June 27th), we have an opportunity to help reduce HIV stigma by sharing our stories and encouraging our loved ones to take an HIV test Exit Disclaimer. Stories can be a powerful tool, and we know there are many powerful HIV testing stories out there. Because new media is about engagement and having a conversation, we’re looking forward to using new media tools in multiple forms – to listen, create, connect and collaborate around HIV testing.

During June, our AIDS.gov blog will host the “I Know. I Took the Test” blog series to highlight several HIV testing story campaigns. We’ll be including videos and text from various campaigns in each blog post. We’ll also be encouraging YOU to submit comments about the campaigns and/or about your experiences getting an HIV test. If you are on Twitter Exit Disclaimer, we encourage you to join the conversation about NHTD, and to use the hashtag #NHTD09 Exit Disclaimer in your tweets.

We’re also excited to offer a widget so that you can share the videos on your own blog, website, or social networking site. We’ll be adding new videos to the widget throughout the month, so you’re guaranteed lots of different videos and stories. Just click the “share” button on the bottom of the widget to copy the code.

What can you do?

In addition to leaving comments and sharing the widget, as we think about reducing stigma to encourage HIV testing, I ask you to consider this: 1) When was the last time (if ever) you took an HIV test? and 2) When was the last time (if ever) you shared a story about what getting an HIV test meant to you?

If your answer to one or both of those questions was “never” or “not recently,” I encourage you to make a change and take an HIV test. And to then tell your story about what it meant to you— no matter the test result.

Please join me, the AIDS.gov team, and our friends, family, partners, and colleagues in sharing your story. Together we can encourage people to act and say, “I Know, I Took the Test.” Together we can help reduce stigma and promote HIV testing.

Interested in knowing which campaigns we’re going to feature? Check back on our blog on Tuesday to see the first one!

Comments

  1. Abhishek Shah says:

    The future belongs to young people …
    and it is us who will be affected most by the decisions we take today on Aids/HIV epidemic, climate change, food, energy, environmental degradation, economic stability and the continuing challenge of world poverty.
    Such decisions will influence the shape and quality of our future lives and could even dictate how long we will live. So it is very important that us, as individuals and as a group, take a keen interest in these issues now – and make absolutely sure our views are heard
    http://www.slideshare.net/abhishekshah/aids-1534610

  2. I took it while on a church conference in South Africa Pastor T.D Jakes even mention how one of the young men that came with him took one becaus he was part of his staff and was unware that he was HIV postive that did it for me I was scared and me another girl that i met in Africa became friends she was from pastor Jakes church we took it together i was a litte nervous but i took it away and a praise God i was negative i never been sexually active like that but it was still good to know praise God!

  3. Just wanted to say that the slideshare by Abhishek Shah is an excellent resource and that I have posted them on my blog for my readers to see as well.
    http://www.abhishekarora.com/2009/06/aids-facts.html
    Thank you!

  4. I don’t think enough people take aids seriously. I’ve personally gotten tested and Urged several of my friends to come with me on the national testing day.

  5. being a mom; and a very young grandma; having done much HIV/AIDS education; this is not a STD. there is no cure. the last thing that i could live with is either of my girls contracting HIV. please think before you engage in any action that would put you at risk for contracting this virus. life is short; treasure and appreciate all of the days that you have. be well. be safe. take care of you.

  6. I know my status because I got tested for HIV. I am a African American women and the statics within my race are still high, it has decrease over the years but it is still important that we know our status and get tested. We need to educate our community and our family and friends as well. I do think people are getting the message but their is some work still that needs to be done.
    This website is very informative and clear. This site provides alot of helpful information in a clear and concise manner. I am glad that I stumbled on to it. I gained alot of helpful information and will definitely spread the word. I hope to post on my blog for my readers too read and get informed.
    Thanks!
    http://mobilehivtesting24-7.over-blog.com

  7. Such decisions will influence the shape and quality of our future lives and could even dictate how long we will live. So it is very important that us, as individuals and as a group, take a keen interest in these issues now – and make absolutely sure our views are heard.
    Thanks
    Sam T.
    http://www.powerlawofattraction.com

  8. I think we owe it to ourselves, family and friends to undertake a HIV test at sometime. It seems that HIV has moved to the back burner as other world issues grab the international headlines. We must not get complacement over this subject and continue to educate all nations on this devasting disease. Education, eductaion , education will be a major help in preventing this spreading further.

  9. Testing for HIV is an easy step to approach for preventing the disease. Knowing your results is important for treating the disease. Education is the primary tool used to fight against the battle. Today you can be tested and know your results in only 20 minutes.

  10. I took a test before the birth of my daughter purely because I had the opportunity of having one. I believe that if you have the opportunity as I did you should take a HIV test. you owe it to your loved ones and of course yourself.
    This is a really important issue, just because the media don’t report on the problem so much doesn’t mean it’s gone away.
    Regards
    Edward. G

  11. Testing for HIV is an easy step to approach for preventing the disease. Knowing your results is important for treating the disease.