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Health Protection Perspectives

Last week, CDC awarded $42 million to community-based organizations (CBOs) in cities and communities across the nation to support HIV prevention efforts. This funding puts resources directly in the hands of those with cultural knowledge and local perspective—those who have the best chance to reach people who might otherwise not access HIV testing or other prevention services.

These partnerships are a vital part of CDC’s fight against HIV. Community-based organizations are part of the daily fabric of our lives and a critical link to providing HIV prevention services where we live, work, and play.

Funding of CBOs is also consistent with the new National HIV/AIDS Strategy, released on July 13, 2010, by the White House. This strategy outlines three critical steps that we must take to reduce HIV infections, including intensifying HIV prevention efforts in communities where HIV is most heavily concentrated; expanding targeted efforts to prevent HIV infection using a combination of effective, evidence-based approaches; and educating all Americans about the threat of HIV and how to prevent it.

The 133 CBOs directly funded by CDC will help address those critical steps. First, they are tasked with implementing effective HIV prevention programs for individuals living with HIV and those at high risk of infection. Next, the CBOs will also use the funding to increase HIV testing and knowledge of status in the communities that they serve—some of the areas hardest hit by the HIV epidemic. Lastly, a limited portion of the funding will be given to some CBOs to assist in monitoring program impact and behavioral outcomes.

CDC also funds hundreds of CBOs indirectly through funding provided to state and local health departments. CDC provides capacity building assistance to all directly and indirectly funded CBOs to ensure the delivery of effective services to communities in need. These efforts are a part of CDC’s tiered approach to HIV prevention that prioritizes intensive, evidence-based interventions.

As part of the tiered approach, CDC is focused on community-level interventions in those areas hardest hit by the HIV epidemic. CDC and it funded partners are working to ensure widespread condom availability, syringe access, targeted HIV testing programs, social marketing for behavior change, and social marketing to foster supportive community norms, like safer sex. For HIV positive and very high risk individuals, HIV testing is the first critical step to the prevention of new infections and is a key component of the National Strategy’s goal of reducing HIV infections.

We are also working to ensure all Americans have access to basic, fundamental knowledge about HIV through CBOs, health departments, partnerships, and national campaigns. We also recommend that all people in the United States aged 14-64 be tested at least once as part of their routine medical care.

In the introduction to the National Strategy, President Barack Obama underscored the need for a more coordinated national response to the HIV epidemic, noting that success will require the commitment of governments at all levels, businesses, faith communities, philanthropy, the scientific and medical commu¬nities, educational institutions, people living with HIV, and others. Please join us; together we can stop the spread of HIV.

Comments

  1. Borris Powell says:

    Dr. Fenton,
    Thank you for maintaining the CDC Legacy of support to community based organizations. As America moves forward on the quest to reduce new HIV infections, I believe the communities most impacted could benefit from an increased understanding of HIV science.
    For example, as I move through the country working with communities of American Black homosexuals, African Americans at large, and other minorities. I remain perplexed at the misinformation in circulation pertaining to HIV in general. Although, we live in information rich time and place, new HIV knowledge reaches these and other American communities too late.
    May 1988, C. Everett Coop, Surgeon General sent the largest mailing in American History. The mailing delivered HIV information into 107,000,000 households.
    Perhaps, in this time of President Barak Obama, it is your turn to utilize his method of internet and text outreach connected with an old world postage stamp.
    A message sent from a doctor with a smile, a Black doctor, using simple language discussing HIV science for all to understand: a catalyst creating a ripple which becomes the wave that shifts the HIV paradigm.
    Your blog is great, more folk need to see it.
    Best regards,
    Borris Powell

  2. Angela says:

    CDC seems like a big support for HIV bason on the information i read in the blog. I believe this can help out many people from causing the HIV virus. This can help you explain and clarify how you can cause HIV. Thank you for putting effort in the CDO cities and communities across the nation to help out HIV prevention efforts.

  3. M.Rodriguez says:

    CDC is really making a difference here.Especially with the funding of hiv testings and prevention to those who arent as lucky to have access to. another good thin is using that 42 million donation for othe cbos who assist in monitoring program impact and behavioral outcomes.

  4. Kyle Landers says:

    CDC can be a really big help for the fight against HIV.I really think can help peeople from spreading AIDS. This also can give you more details on how you caught it and how you can prevent from spreading it, and more peolpe should take a look into this to see what to do or not to do.

  5. George Maris says:

    The CDC ontinues its efforts in the stategy against AIDS. As a non profit organization in Charlottesville VA the CDC has helped impliment reasourses in this struggle against HIV and AIDS.

  6. George Maris says:

    As part of the tiered approach, CDC is focused on community-level interventions in those areas hardest hit by the HIV epidemic. CDC and it funded partners are working to ensure widespread condom availability, syringe access, targeted HIV testing programs, social marketing for behavior change, and social marketing to foster supportive community norms, like safer sex. For HIV positive and very high risk individuals, HIV testing is the first critical step to the prevention of new infections and is a key component of the National Strategy’s goal of reducing HIV infections.
    could not have said it better myself!

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