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November’s Top 10 Ways the National HIV/AIDS Strategy Improves the National Response to HIV/AIDS

Top 10

Last week, we announced that we’d be posting monthly National HIV/AIDS Strategy (NHAS) Top Ten lists to reinforce key parts of the NHAS. Today’s post is November’s Top Ten list.

By 2015, the National HIV/AIDS Strategy aims to:

Reduce new HIV infections

  1. Lower the annual number of new infections by 25%
  2. Reduce HIV transmission by 30%
  3. Increase the percentage of people living with HIV who know their serostatus from 79% to 90%

Increase access to care and improve health outcomes for people living with HIV

  1. Increase the proportion of newly diagnosed patients linked to clinical care from 65% to 85%
  2. Increase the proportion of Ryan White HIV/AIDS Program clients who are in continuous care from 73% to 80%
  3. Increase the number of Ryan White clients with permanent housing from 82% to 86%

Reduce HIV-related health disparities

  1. Improve access to prevention and care services for all Americans
  2. Increase the proportion of HIV-diagnosed gay and bisexual men with undetectable viral load by 20%
  3. Increase the proportion of HIV-diagnosed Blacks with undetectable viral load by 20%
  4. Increase the proportion of HIV-diagnosed Latinos with undetectable viral load by 20%
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Comments

  1. Zoe says:

    This is a list of top ten desired outcomes. It really says very little about the strategy.

  2. George Maris says:

    The stigma associated with HIV/AIDS can only be addressed by education and informative resourses.

  3. George Maris says:

    Although strategies continue in the efforts of combating HIV/AIDS, stigma is still the forerunner in the epidemic. People are more ashamed of “how family response will affect them rather than the virus itself. My theory of ” The Egg Approach” in which counseling on, ones inside emotions and how treatment affects decision making is based. When people living with HIV/AIDS worry more about “how they contracted the virus” and how others might perceive them, affects treatment options and care. The stigma associated with HIV/AIDS affects families and people living with this disease.

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