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CDC Releases Data on New Cases of HIV

Johnathan MerminToday, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention released new data on HIV incidence in the United States from 2007 to 2010. There were an estimated 47,500 new HIV infections in 2010, and incidence remains relatively stable at about 50,000. Data from this report also show two noteworthy trends; first, between 2008 and 2010, new HIV infections among African American women declined 21 percent, giving us cause for cautious optimism. Secondly, however, there was an increase in incidence of 22 percent among young gay and bisexual men aged 13 to 24 years.

While we are encouraged to see declines among African American women, they remain one of the most severely affected populations. As for youth, last month’s Vital Signs focused on the issue of HIV among youth aged 13 to 24 years in the United States, among whom 72 percent of all new infections were attributable to male-to-male sex.  In addition, 54 percent of new HIV infections were among African-American and 20% were among Hispanic/Latino gay and bisexual youth.

These new data establish a baseline for the National HIV/AIDS Strategy (NHAS) goal of decreasing new HIV infections by 25 percent by 2015. CDC is using a High Impact Prevention approach to programs, policy, and research, and partnering with state and local health departments, community-based and national organizations, and multiple federal agencies such as the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA), the National Institutes of Health (NIH) and the Substance Abuse and Mental Services Health Administration (SAMSHA), to have the greatest effect possible on HIV prevention and care.

To reach this NHAS goal, we need to continue to have national involvement in HIV prevention and care from all parts of society, including lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender communities and organizations, African-American and Latino leaders, and everyone who has, or is affected by, HIV. We can’t afford for a new and vibrant generation to lose its health to a preventable disease.

Note from AIDS.gov: On the CDC website you can find a fact sheet on this data.

Comments

  1. It is scary how quickly HIV is still spreading. I am a nursing assistant in a hospital and we come across all germs and diseases, a lot of which can be prevented.
    I think one of the biggest problems with HIV is that is does not have a face until someone is the stage of AIDS and therefore all gets forgotten!
    God Bless everyone!

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