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Care Counts: Women, Families, and the Affordable Care Act Challenge Contest

Editor’s note: For more information about the contest, including rules, updates, and discussions, please visit the Care Counts page at www.carecounts.challenge.gov.

About the Challenge

Challenge.gov. Government Challenges, Your SolutionsWomen are often at the center of healthy and resilient families; they make approximately 80% of all family health care decisions and are more likely to be the primary caregivers for children and elderly parents.  To help make women aware of the important benefits available to them and their families through the Affordable Care Act, HHS is initiating this Challenge.

The Affordable Care Act is already making a difference in the lives of millions of Americans.  Starting October 1, 2013, millions of uninsured Americans will be able to find affordable health insurance that meets their needs at the new Health Insurance Marketplace (Marketplace). The Marketplace is a one stop shop where people can learn about health insurance, get accurate information on different plans, and make apples-to-apples comparison of private insurance plans. For the first time, comprehensive information about benefits and quality, side by side with facts about price, will help each consumer make the best coverage decision. For more information about how the Marketplace will work, including important deadlines and milestones, visit HealthCare.gov (English) or CuidadoDeSalud.gov (Spanish).

This Challenge calls for the creation of an innovative, educational Tool that informs women about enrollment in their State’s Marketplace as well as key provisions of the Affordable Care Act designed specifically to improve their health and that of their families.  Sponsored by the Office of Women’s Health at the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) and the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Office on Women’s Health, in collaboration with the Coordinating Committee on Women’s Health, the Challenge aims to reach all women, but particularly those in medically underserved communities.

How to Enter

All Tools must be submitted through the Care Counts: Women, Families, and the Affordable Care Act Challenge Contest page on www.carecounts.challenge.gov.

A complete submission to this Challenge will include the Tool, a one-paragraph description for promotional and public voting purposes, and a 1-2 page Promotion/Outreach Plan for the Tool.

A Tool is defined as a print, web or social media product (including Facebook, Twitter, Google+, Apps, and/or other innovative resources) used to increase awareness and understanding for the target audience and motivate them to take action.  The target audience includes adult women in the United States and its territories, particularly women living in medically underserved communities or those who experience difficulty accessing health care.  The Tool should communicate complex information in understandable, culturally-competent, and relevant ways.  Reading level, common language, and health literacy of the target audiences should be considered.

For purposes of this Challenge, the key provision of the Affordable Care Act is coverage of 22 preventive services for women without copayment. See https://www.healthcare.gov/what-are-my-preventive-care-benefits#part=2

The Tool must refer to two or more of the 22 covered preventive services for women. The Tool must also direct consumers to HealthCare.gov (English) or CuidadoDeSalud.gov (Spanish), and the toll-free Centers for Medicare and Medicaid (CMS) call centers (1-800-318-2596) (English and Spanish) to promote enrollment in the Marketplace.   The Tool must also include the TTY/TTD call center number (1-888-871-6594).

The Tool may be designed to be used within systems of health care.  For purposes of this Challenge, a system of health care is defined as the organization of people, institutions, and resources to deliver culturally-competent, quality, comprehensive services to meet the health needs of the target audience.  Examples include HRSA’s Community Health Centers, Healthy Start programs, Ryan White Care service sites, National Health Service Corps sites, and HHS-supported Title X service sites. The Tool may also be designed to be used in community-based settings where women live, work, and purchase goods and services, such as schools, faith-based settings, recreation centers, and shopping centers.

Prizes

First Place English print, web-based or social media – $7,500

First Place Winners will be awarded prize dollars in the amount of $7,500 each and receive a signed certificate from the HRSA Administrator. The First Place Winners’ Tools will be posted to the HRSA Website and will be broadly disseminated through the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services distribution channels.

First Place Spanish print, web-based or social media – $7,500

First Place Winners will be awarded prize dollars in the amount of $7,500 each and receive a signed certificate from the HRSA Administrator. The First Place Winners’ Tools will be posted to the HRSA Website and will be broadly disseminated through the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services distribution channels.

Second Place English print, web-based or social media – $5,000

Second Place Winners will be awarded prize dollars in the amount of $5,000 each, receive a signed certificate from the HRSA Administrator, and their Tools will be posted to the HRSA Website.

Second Place Spanish print, web-based or social media – $5,000

Second Place Winners will be awarded prize dollars in the amount of $5,000 each, receive a signed certificate from the HRSA Administrator, and their Tools will be posted to the HRSA Website.

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Comments

  1. Mary Moore says:

    Generally, behavior should pointed out to the young women especially African american women that is statistically challenged with resources of finding the Hiv disease. Behavior would be to this women of saying I am smart enough to say I can do all things through Christ. When a negative behavior is there, we have positive challenges to find better things to our body like the cure for HIV.

  2. Patrick Grady says:

    I think it is deeply offensive that the dept of HHS can continuously promote the health of women and not men. Isnt there any sense of shame that a government department that is suppose to be representing all americans can consistently send female only messages ? Why is that the head of the HHS consistently blogs about womens issues only ? Is this what we can expect of feminism and their version of equality ?

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