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Accessibility/Section 508

AIDS.gov Podcast

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Editor’s Note: Miguel Gomez, Director of AIDS.gov, Office of HIV/AIDS Policy, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services and, Jeremy Vanderlan, Mobile Practice Lead, ICF International, speak on this podcast with Karen McGrane and Ethan Marcotte of the Responsive Web Design Podcast. In 2012, AIDS.gov implemented “responsive web design” and was one of the first…

Social Media and Accessibility: Resources to Know

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When the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) was passed in 1990, there was no Facebook, Twitter, or LinkedIn. Since then, the number of social media channels, and their use for communication among all demographics, has grown exponentially. Unfortunately, however, despite newer ways to reach individuals living with disabilities, many individuals in this community face challenges…

Catching up with Communities of Color: Online and New Media Use

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In our last post on the United States Conference on AIDS , we talked about a number of programs that are using new media to reach minority communities with HIV/AIDS information and resources. At the conference we heard about HIV/AIDS programs trying to be where many of their communities are: online and using new media….

Doing the Right Thing–508 Compliance

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In our post last week, we talked about planning and putting people first before choosing new technology. We highlighted the POST strategy which starts with: P = People. Who is your target audience? What tools are they using? We believe in putting people first, and that means our website content must be equally accessible to…

Information for All: 508 Compliance

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In our previous post, we noted how proud we were of our AIDS.gov video podcast series! And when we first started producing podcasts we thought they were accessible to everyone because we provided both an audio file and a transcript. But then we learned that our podcasts would have to be closed-captioned as well.