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Addressing Viral Hepatitis Among Minority Communities

J. Nadine Gracia

Since 1991, routine vaccinations of infants has reduced hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection rates in children by more than 95 percent. And the incidence of acute hepatitis C (HCV) has declined 90 percent since 1992, in large part due to the screening of the blood supply. This progress illustrates the impact that public health policies…

Digital Storytelling: A Community Tool to End HIV Stigma

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All the Truly Important Things - Digital Storytelling

At AIDS.gov we’ve been thinking a lot about the power of storytelling. In the HIV community, everyone has a story to bring to the table, and more people are sharing theirs with new media. Many tools are available to help to facilitate storytelling and have conversations around HIV. One example of a tool used to…

AIDS 2012: Defining an Exit Strategy for Ending AIDS in Black America

Phill Wilson

The Black AIDS Institute is a local community partner for AIDS 2012. AIDS.gov asked the Institute to share its perspective on the conference.

Every two years, the International AIDS Conference (AIDS 2012) serves as the most important HIV-related scientific meeting in the world. This year’s conference—the first in the U.S. in more than two decades—is…

Raising Awareness of Hepatitis B In the Asian and Pacific Islander Communities

Dr. Howard Koh

This month we are observing both Asian and Pacific Islander Heritage Month and Hepatitis Awareness Month. The dual observances are an important opportunity to bring attention to the disproportionate burden of viral hepatitis among the Asian American and Pacific Islander communities in the United States and to renew our commitment and call to action to…

Eliminating Disparities in HIV/AIDS

J. Nadine Gracia

As we commemorate National Minority Health Month during April, we recognize that this is truly a moment of unprecedented opportunity for health equity – including equity in HIV prevention and care. One year after the launch of the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS)’ first-ever Action Plan to Reduce Racial and Ethnic Health Disparities…

Historically Black Colleges and Universities: Important Allies in the National HIV/AIDS Strategy

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Universities and colleges play an important role in the nation’s response to HIV/AIDS—educating young people; preparing the next generations of health care providers, researchers, teachers, and public health professionals; conducting research that helps us improve our response; and even educating their faculty, staff and communities about HIV/AIDS. In fact, the National HIV/AIDS Strategy points specifically…

Reducing Viral Hepatitis Disparities Among African Americans

Ronald Valdiserri

As we observe African American History Month, we are also working to raise awareness of the silent epidemic of viral hepatitis in the Black community. You may have seen the blog post earlier this month by my colleague Dr. Nadine Gracia, Deputy Assistant Secretary for Minority Health. She highlighted some of the troubling viral hepatitis…

African Americans and the National HIV/AIDS Strategy

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blog.aids.gov

During this February’s observance of Black History Month, we have observed National Black HIV/AIDS Awareness Day (NBHAAD) and heard about efforts to eliminate viral hepatitis disparities among the African American community.  We must also take note of the importance that the National HIV/AIDS Strategy places on addressing HIV/AIDS and its disproportionate impact on African American…