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Future Directions for NIAID’s HIV Vaccine Clinical Research

Future Directions for NIAID HIV Research

Co-authored by Margaret I. Johnston, Ph.D., Director of the Vaccine Research Program in NIAID’s Division of AIDS Carl W. Dieffenbach, PhD Margaret I. Johnston, PhD The development of a safe and effective preventive vaccine for HIV remains one of NIAID’s highest priorities. As we look to the future, we are also seeking to expand the…

Looking Ahead: NIAID’s Future HIV/AIDS Therapeutics Priorities

Future Directions for NIAID HIV Research

Since the 1980s when the HIV/AIDS epidemic was first recognized, NIAID-supported clinical research has helped to save millions of lives and played a key role in defining the standard of care for treating HIV infection. This blog post describes what we are seeking for the next wave of HIV/AIDS therapeutic approaches. Specifically, we have identified…

Future Priorities for NIAID’s HIV Prevention Research

Future Directions for NIAID HIV Research

As we begin to discuss the restructuring of NIAID’s clinical trials networks, let us first focus on the Institute’s HIV prevention research agenda. Developing new biomedical tools that can safely and effectively prevent HIV acquisition and transmission is critical to addressing the global HIV/AIDS pandemic. Currently, we are exploring several promising HIV prevention strategies that,…

Restructuring NIAID’s HIV/AIDS Clinical Trials Networks

Future Directions for NIAID HIV Research

Over the next several weeks, the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID) will post a series of entries here on AIDS.gov related to planning for the future of NIAID’s HIV/AIDS clinical trial networks. The awards supporting the six current HIV/AIDS networks are set to expire in 2013 and 2014. Building on the success…

Pursuing a “Cure” for HIV/AIDS – Two Distinct Approaches

Dr. Carl Dieffenbach, PhD

Contrary to what you may have heard or read on the Internet, there is currently no cure for HIV/AIDS. While some say that there may never be a cure, I believe there is reason for hope. That’s because some of our best scientists are working on two distinct approaches to finding a cure for HIV/AIDS,…

Drug Regimen with Short Pauses Controls HIV and Could Lower Costs, Toxicity

blog.aids.gov

Antiretroviral drugs for HIV infection usually are taken daily, and interrupting treatment for long periods of time has proven detrimental. However, a clinical trial in Uganda has found that pausing antiretroviral therapy (ART) for just two days every week is at least as effective as taking ART continuously over a 72-week period. In addition, the…

Putting TLC+ to the Test

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Dr. Carl Dieffenbach, PhD

If we routinely test everyone for HIV and treat those who are infected, could we bring an end to the HIV/AIDS epidemic? The test and treat concept, modeled on data from South Africa by scientists at the World Health Organization, is a provocative HIV prevention strategy. According to mathematical modeling, a successfully implemented test and…

Goals of a Social Networking Symposium for NIH Staff

STEP: Staff Training in Extramural Programs

AIDS.gov note: Earlier this month, AIDS.gov presented an overview on using new and social media to approximately 400 Federal staff from the National Institutes of Health. (The session was offered both live and via webcast.) We applaud NIH’s commitment to providing ongoing educational opportunities for their staff. Megan Morena, Janice Nall, Miguel Gomez To learn…