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Search Results for: "National Institute of Mental Health"

White House Meeting on HIV Stigma Examines Interventions, Measures, Actions

White House Meeting on HIV Stigma: Research for a Robust Response

Summary: On March 3, ONAP and NIH co-hosted the White House Meeting on HIV Stigma: Research for a Robust Response. As we approach the 35th anniversary of the first case reports of what would later come to be known as HIV/AIDS, we can rightfully celebrate that we now have an array of effective tools to prevent…

NIAID to Fund Further Study of Dapivirine Vaginal Ring for HIV Prevention Investment in HOPE Trial Augments Development of Next-Generation Prevention Tools

NIAID image - vaginal ring - ASPIRE study

The National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID), part of the National Institutes of Health (NIH), announced today that it would move forward with an open-label extension study of an HIV prevention tool for women: a silicone ring that continuously releases the experimental antiretroviral drug dapivirine in the vagina. The new study builds on…

Words Matter: Communicating to End HIV-Related Stigma

Rich Wolitski - headshot - March 2016

Words matter. They can motivate, empower, and lift people up. They can also do a great deal of damage and tear people down. I was reminded of this in many different ways at the meeting on HIV stigma that the Office of National AIDS Policy (ONAP) and the National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH) recently…

Vaginal Ring Provides Partial Protection from HIV in Large Multinational Trial

Woman holding the dapivirine vaginal ring tested in the NIH-funded ASPIRE study.
Credit: International Partnership for Microbicides

NIH-Funded Study Finds Protective Effect Strongest in Women over Age 25 A ring that continuously releases an experimental antiretroviral drug in the vagina safely provided a modest level of protection against HIV infection in women, a large clinical trial in four sub-Saharan African countries has found. The ring reduced the risk of HIV infection by…

Early Antiretroviral Therapy Prevents Non-Aids Outcomes in HIV-Infected People, NIH-Supported Study Finds

NIH logo

New Findings Illustrate Manifold Benefit of Therapy Starting antiretroviral therapy early not only prevents serious AIDS-related diseases, but also prevents the onset of cancer, cardiovascular disease, and other non-AIDS-related diseases in HIV-infected people, according to a new analysis of data from the Strategic Timing of AntiRetroviral Treatment (START) study, the first large-scale randomized clinical trial to…

HIV Control Through Treatment Durably Prevents Heterosexual Transmission of Virus

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NIH-Funded Trial Proves Suppressive Antiretroviral Therapy for HIV-infected People Effective in Protecting Uninfected Partners ​Antiretroviral treatment that consistently suppresses HIV is highly effective at preventing sexual transmission of the virus in heterosexual couples where one person is HIV-infected and the other is not, investigators report today at the 8th International AIDS Society Conference on HIV…

Starting antiretroviral treatment early improves outcomes for HIV-infected individuals

nih logo

For Immediate Release: Wednesday, May 27, 2015 NIH-funded trial results likely will impact global treatment guidelines A major international randomized clinical trial has found that HIV-infected individuals have a considerably lower risk of developing AIDS or other serious illnesses if they start taking antiretroviral drugs sooner, when their CD4+ T-cell count—a key measure of immune…

NIH, South African Medical Research Council award $8 million in HIV, TB grants

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The National Institutes of Health and the South African Medical Research Council (SAMRC) are awarding 31 grants to U.S. and South African scientists to support research targeting HIV/AIDS, tuberculosis and HIV-related co-morbidities and cancers. The awards, which total $8 million in first-year funding, are the first to be issued through the South Africa–U.S. Program for…